The Bandulus’ Jeremy Peña on Fusing Ska and Tejano Music and New Album Tell It Like It Is: Podcast

The musician looks to carry on the legacy of artists like The Skatalites, Alton Ellis, and Ken Boothe. 

The Bandulus’ Jeremy Peña on Fusing Ska and Tejano Music and New Album Tell It Like It Is: Podcast
Consequence Staff

Consequence

 Listen via: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Amazon Music | More Platforms What drives a musician to play music overtly rooted in traditional ska and rocksteady? And how do they honor those roots while simultaneously giving it a contemporary flavor? This week on In Defense of Ska, Jeremy Peña of The Bandulus talks about he sought…

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Green Day, Notorious B.I.G., and Blondie Albums Added to National Recording Registry

ABBA, The Chicks, and Bill Withers are also among “the defining sounds of history” preserved this year.

Green Day, Notorious B.I.G., and Blondie Albums Added to National Recording Registry
Eddie Fu

Consequence

The Library of Congress has announced this year’s selection of 25 “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant” pieces of recorded music to archive into the National Recording Registry, led by albums from Green Day, The Notorious B.I.G., and Blondie. In addition to Green Day’s seminal Dookie, The Notorious B.I.G.’s classic debut Ready…

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Florida’s The Fest Unveils 2024 Lineup Led by Hot Water Music and Bouncing Souls

Streetlight Manifesto, Matt and Kim, Superchunk, Ted Leo and the Pharmacists, Joyce Manor, and more are also on the bill.

Florida’s The Fest Unveils 2024 Lineup Led by Hot Water Music and Bouncing Souls
Spencer Kaufman

Consequence

The first wave of bands has been unveiled for the 2024 edition of The Fest, an annual punk gathering in Gainesville, Florida. Hot Water Music, The Bouncing Souls, Streetlight Manifesto, Matt and Kim, Superchunk, Ted Leo and the Pharmacists, Joyce Manor, and more are playing the three-day event set for…

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Sublime perform ‘Romeo’ at Coachella for the first time in 25 years

The last time the song was performed was in 1998

The post Sublime perform ‘Romeo’ at Coachella for the first time in 25 years appeared first on NME.

NME

Sublime have performed their 1991 track ‘Romeo’ for the first time in 25 years at this year’s edition of Coachella.

The legendary band were initially active between 1988 and 1996, before frontman Bradley Nowell died from a heroin overdose at the age of 28.

Today (April 13), the ska punk band took over the main stage at the annual music and arts festival with Nowell’s son Jakob stepping in for his father, performing at the same age his dad was when he passed.

Jakob was joined by original Sublime band members Bud Gaugh and Eric Wilson for a sun-soaked set filled with all of the hits. They played ‘Romeo’ for the first time since 1998, to which Jakob said the song “has not been played in like 100 years.”

Nowell jr. also played with his father’s custom guitar and Mesa Boogie amp and Gaugh played with his OG signature green drum kit marking the first time the drum kit and guitar were on the same stage since the last Sublime tour in 1996 (per Variety).

Fans were in awe with Jakob’s performance with journalist Suzy Exposito tweeting: “I’m getting CHILLS watching Sublime: The Next Generation. Where has Jakob Nowell been all this time?!?!”, while another user wrote: “Watching Bradley Nowells son Jakob Nowell play Coachella with Sublime right now is some legendary shit.”

Elswhere in the set, Jakob teased bringing out Lana Del Rey for ‘Doin Time’. They also covered Bob Marley & The Wailers’ ‘Jailhouse’ and wrapped up with their 1997 single ‘Santeria’.

Sublime played: 

‘April 29, 1992 (Miami)’
‘Garden Grove’
‘Wrong Way’
‘Same in the End’
‘STP’
‘Pawn Shop’
‘What I Got’
‘Greatest-Hits’
‘Date Rape’
‘Badfish’
‘Jailhouse’ (Bob Marley & The Wailers cover)
‘Romeo’ (First confirmed performance since 1988)
‘Doin’ Time’
‘Santeria’

In other Coachella news, The Last Dinner Party stunned fans with their debut festival set.

The British quintet took over the Gobi stage at the annual music and arts festival, performing their hit tracks along with a few new songs adorned in their signature Victorian frocks.

Elsewhere, Vampire Weekend closed out their last minute Coachella set with a surprise appearance from Paris Hilton and Abraham Lincoln during their country “Cocaine Cowboys” medley. For more live updates as it happens, check out NME’s liveblog for Coachella 2024 here.

Check back here for the latest news, reviews and more from Coachella 2024. 

The post Sublime perform ‘Romeo’ at Coachella for the first time in 25 years appeared first on NME.

Cherym pull out of The Great Escape Festival due to its links with Barclays bank

The band cites the bank’s investment in companies that are arming the IDF in its “atrocities against Palestinians”

The post Cherym pull out of The Great Escape Festival due to its links with Barclays bank appeared first on NME.

NME

Cherym have announced that they have pulled out of playing The Great Escape this year, due to the festival’s connection with Barclays bank.

The Derry punk band shared a statement on social media outlining their reasoning, highlighting the bank’s financial investment in companies that supply arms to Israel.

“We have made the decision to pull out of The Great Escape Festival next month,” the statement reads.

“Barclays/Barclaycard are responsible for investing over £1bn+ into companies that are arming the IDF and providing weaponry that enables the ongoing atrocities against Palestinians to continue.”

“Due to The Great Escape’s connection with Barclays/Barclaycard, we feel in good conscience, that we cannot go ahead with our scheduled performances at The Great Escape. We have been told by The Great Escape that the festival has no affiliation with Barclays/Barclaycard directly this year, but due to the refusal to remove them as a sponsor from their advertising we simply cannot take part.”

NME has contacted The Great Escape for a response to the band’s decision.

The band go on to share a petition that was started by the promoter How to Catch a Pig and the band The Menstrual Cramps, and has since been signed by artists including Kneecap, Lambrini Girls, Alfie Templeman, Lip Critic, Wunderhorse and Mary in the Junkyard. The petition can be found here.

It reads: “A bank that is involved in Israel’s genocide has no place at The Great Escape, which is a fixture of the independent music scene and has a prized place in the industry. We refuse to let music be used to whitewash human rights violations. We cannot let our creative outputs become smokescreens behind which money is pumped into murdering Palestinians.”

The Mentrual Cramps have also pulled out of playing The Great Escape, as have bands including Orchards and Other Half. The labels Alcopop! Records and Big Scary Monsters have also shared their decision to pull out of the festival, stating: “To be associating with Barclays doesn’t sit right with our ethical standpoint, and if we can do anything to help raise awareness, and ultimately highlight the corporate greed at the heart of this horrendous genocide in Gaza, we will.”

The move comes a month after swathes of artists refused to play Austin’s SXSW Festival, due to its connections with the US Army and weapons companies amid the Israel-Gaza conflict.

Gruff RhysKneecap, SprintsLambrini Girls, GelRachel Chinouriri, Cardinals and NewDad  all eventually pulled out from SXSW, as well as every Irish act on the bill. Many of the artists expressed that they had made the decision out of solidarity with the people of Palestine.

In light of the withdrawals, SXSW released a statement regarding all of the bands and artists who have been pulling out of the festival, saying: “We are an organisation that welcomes diverse viewpoints. Music is the soul of SXSW, and it has long been our legacy. We fully respect the decision these artists made to exercise their right to free speech.”

Explaining its sponsorship with the US Army, SXSW wrote: “The defence industry has historically been a proving ground for many of the systems we rely on today. These institutions are often leaders in emerging technologies, and we believe it’s better to understand how their approach will impact our lives.”

Cherym released their debut album ‘Take It Or Leave It’ in February. In a four-star review, NME wrote: “‘Take It Or Leave It’ is as much of a blast to listen to as it is a clear look at the world around us. This is who Cherym are and what they stand for – and these songs make their mission statement of joy and unity hard to forget.”

The post Cherym pull out of The Great Escape Festival due to its links with Barclays bank appeared first on NME.

Cherym pull out of The Great Escape Festival due to its links with Barclays bank

The band cites the bank’s investment in companies that are arming the IDF in its “atrocities against Palestinians”

The post Cherym pull out of The Great Escape Festival due to its links with Barclays bank appeared first on NME.

NME

Cherym have announced that they have pulled out of playing The Great Escape this year, due to the festival’s connection with Barclays bank.

The Derry punk band shared a statement on social media outlining their reasoning, highlighting the bank’s financial investment in companies that supply arms to Israel.

“We have made the decision to pull out of The Great Escape Festival next month,” the statement reads.

“Barclays/Barclaycard are responsible for investing over £1bn+ into companies that are arming the IDF and providing weaponry that enables the ongoing atrocities against Palestinians to continue.”

“Due to The Great Escape’s connection with Barclays/Barclaycard, we feel in good conscience, that we cannot go ahead with our scheduled performances at The Great Escape. We have been told by The Great Escape that the festival has no affiliation with Barclays/Barclaycard directly this year, but due to the refusal to remove them as a sponsor from their advertising we simply cannot take part.”

NME has contacted The Great Escape for a response to the band’s decision.

The band go on to share a petition that was started by the promoter How to Catch a Pig and the band The Menstrual Cramps, and has since been signed by artists including Kneecap, Lambrini Girls, Alfie Templeman, Lip Critic, Wunderhorse and Mary in the Junkyard. The petition can be found here.

It reads: “A bank that is involved in Israel’s genocide has no place at The Great Escape, which is a fixture of the independent music scene and has a prized place in the industry. We refuse to let music be used to whitewash human rights violations. We cannot let our creative outputs become smokescreens behind which money is pumped into murdering Palestinians.”

The Mentrual Cramps have also pulled out of playing The Great Escape, as have bands including Orchards and Other Half. The labels Alcopop! Records and Big Scary Monsters have also shared their decision to pull out of the festival, stating: “To be associating with Barclays doesn’t sit right with our ethical standpoint, and if we can do anything to help raise awareness, and ultimately highlight the corporate greed at the heart of this horrendous genocide in Gaza, we will.”

The move comes a month after swathes of artists refused to play Austin’s SXSW Festival, due to its connections with the US Army and weapons companies amid the Israel-Gaza conflict.

Gruff RhysKneecap, SprintsLambrini Girls, GelRachel Chinouriri, Cardinals and NewDad  all eventually pulled out from SXSW, as well as every Irish act on the bill. Many of the artists expressed that they had made the decision out of solidarity with the people of Palestine.

In light of the withdrawals, SXSW released a statement regarding all of the bands and artists who have been pulling out of the festival, saying: “We are an organisation that welcomes diverse viewpoints. Music is the soul of SXSW, and it has long been our legacy. We fully respect the decision these artists made to exercise their right to free speech.”

Explaining its sponsorship with the US Army, SXSW wrote: “The defence industry has historically been a proving ground for many of the systems we rely on today. These institutions are often leaders in emerging technologies, and we believe it’s better to understand how their approach will impact our lives.”

Cherym released their debut album ‘Take It Or Leave It’ in February. In a four-star review, NME wrote: “‘Take It Or Leave It’ is as much of a blast to listen to as it is a clear look at the world around us. This is who Cherym are and what they stand for – and these songs make their mission statement of joy and unity hard to forget.”

The post Cherym pull out of The Great Escape Festival due to its links with Barclays bank appeared first on NME.

Cherym pull out of The Great Escape Festival due to its links with Barclays bank

The band cites the bank’s investment in companies that are arming the IDF in its “atrocities against Palestinians”

The post Cherym pull out of The Great Escape Festival due to its links with Barclays bank appeared first on NME.

NME

Cherym have announced that they have pulled out of playing The Great Escape this year, due to the festival’s connection with Barclays bank.

The Derry punk band shared a statement on social media outlining their reasoning, highlighting the bank’s financial investment in companies that supply arms to Israel.

“We have made the decision to pull out of The Great Escape Festival next month,” the statement reads.

“Barclays/Barclaycard are responsible for investing over £1bn+ into companies that are arming the IDF and providing weaponry that enables the ongoing atrocities against Palestinians to continue.”

“Due to The Great Escape’s connection with Barclays/Barclaycard, we feel in good conscience, that we cannot go ahead with our scheduled performances at The Great Escape. We have been told by The Great Escape that the festival has no affiliation with Barclays/Barclaycard directly this year, but due to the refusal to remove them as a sponsor from their advertising we simply cannot take part.”

NME has contacted The Great Escape for a response to the band’s decision.

The band go on to share a petition that was started by the promoter How to Catch a Pig and the band The Menstrual Cramps, and has since been signed by artists including Kneecap, Lambrini Girls, Alfie Templeman, Lip Critic, Wunderhorse and Mary in the Junkyard. The petition can be found here.

It reads: “A bank that is involved in Israel’s genocide has no place at The Great Escape, which is a fixture of the independent music scene and has a prized place in the industry. We refuse to let music be used to whitewash human rights violations. We cannot let our creative outputs become smokescreens behind which money is pumped into murdering Palestinians.”

The Mentrual Cramps have also pulled out of playing The Great Escape, as have bands including Orchards and Other Half. The labels Alcopop! Records and Big Scary Monsters have also shared their decision to pull out of the festival, stating: “To be associating with Barclays doesn’t sit right with our ethical standpoint, and if we can do anything to help raise awareness, and ultimately highlight the corporate greed at the heart of this horrendous genocide in Gaza, we will.”

The move comes a month after swathes of artists refused to play Austin’s SXSW Festival, due to its connections with the US Army and weapons companies amid the Israel-Gaza conflict.

Gruff RhysKneecap, SprintsLambrini Girls, GelRachel Chinouriri, Cardinals and NewDad  all eventually pulled out from SXSW, as well as every Irish act on the bill. Many of the artists expressed that they had made the decision out of solidarity with the people of Palestine.

In light of the withdrawals, SXSW released a statement regarding all of the bands and artists who have been pulling out of the festival, saying: “We are an organisation that welcomes diverse viewpoints. Music is the soul of SXSW, and it has long been our legacy. We fully respect the decision these artists made to exercise their right to free speech.”

Explaining its sponsorship with the US Army, SXSW wrote: “The defence industry has historically been a proving ground for many of the systems we rely on today. These institutions are often leaders in emerging technologies, and we believe it’s better to understand how their approach will impact our lives.”

Cherym released their debut album ‘Take It Or Leave It’ in February. In a four-star review, NME wrote: “‘Take It Or Leave It’ is as much of a blast to listen to as it is a clear look at the world around us. This is who Cherym are and what they stand for – and these songs make their mission statement of joy and unity hard to forget.”

The post Cherym pull out of The Great Escape Festival due to its links with Barclays bank appeared first on NME.

One of these eight new artists will be playing Glastonbury 2024 as Emerging Talent Competition finalists revealed

The winners of the live finals will be announced at the end of the month

The post One of these eight new artists will be playing Glastonbury 2024 as Emerging Talent Competition finalists revealed appeared first on NME.

NME

Glastonbury’s Emerging Talent Competition is back for 2024, and the eight shortlisted artists have been announced. Check them out below.

Taking place each year, the free-to-enter contest gives up-and-coming musicians the chance to play at one of the festival’s main stages, as well as a £5,000 Talent Development prize from PRS Foundation to help develop their songwriting and performing.

The two runners-up will each be awarded a £2,500 PRS Foundation Talent Development prize.

This year’s edition of the competition launched back in January, and last month the 90 artists who had made the longlist was shared.

Now, the 90 artists have been whittled down to the final eight – with one set to be announced as the winner of this year’s instalment later this month.

“We’re very pleased to announce the finalists for our EMERGING TALENT COMPETITION 2024, which is supported by PRS for Music and PRS Foundation,” Glastonbury shared on their X/Twitter page earlier this morning (April 11). “The acts, chosen from thousands of entries, are: The Ayoub Sisters, Bryte, Caleb Kunle, JayaHadADream, KID 12, Nadia Kadek, Olivia Nelson, and Problem Patterns.”

In a separate post, they added: “This year’s invite-only final will take place on Saturday 27 April, 2024,” and shared further details on what prizes will be awarded to the winner and two runners-up. They also shared a custom-made playlist, which features one track from each of the shortlisted acts. Check it out below.

The first of the hand-picked artists are The Ayoub Sisters – a multi-instrumental musical duo consisting of siblings Sarah and Laura Ayoub, who arrange and perform instrumental versions of famous pop and classical works. Discovered by Mark Ronson, the sisters recently shared their latest album ‘Arabesque’, which is a celebration of and tribute to music from the Arab World.

The second listed artist on the playlist is Olivia Nelson, a modern-era R&B singer who channelled her emotion into her debut EP ‘For You’. She cites Whitney Houston and Mariah Carey as inspirations when it comes to vocal ability, and is already gaining momentum for her contemporary R&B and Motown roots.

Problem Patterns are also named on the shortlist. They are a four-piece feminist queer punk band from Belfast, comprised of Beverley Boal, Bethany Crooks, Ciara King and Alanah Smith. Emerging back in 2018 with a new take on punk, they have already gone on to lock in support slots with the likes of Le Tigre, Bob Vylan, Dream Wife & Ash.

KID 12, an emerging ambient artist who recently emerged with two 2024 singles ‘Dreams’ and ‘BETS OFF’, and singer-songwriter Nadia Kadek – who opened for Marika Hackman earlier this year and was shortlisted for artist submission at Live At Leeds festival in 2023 – are also named, as is thought-provoking Jamaican-Irish independent rapper, singer and producer, JayaHadADream.

Finally, Bryte completes the line-up – a London-based Ghanaian rapper and vocalist, who raps in five languages and has developed a cult following due to his unique fusion of afro-electronic, rap and experimental club sounds.

This year’s final will take place on Saturday April 27.

Sir Elton John performs on the Pyramid stage during day 5 of Glastonbury Festival 2023 Worthy Farm, Pilton on June 25, 2023 in Glastonbury, England. (Photo by Jim Dyson/Redferns)

Speaking about the competition, Glastonbury co-organiser Emily Eavis said: “At a time when it’s not always easy for acts to get their foot on the ladder, we’re really happy to be able to offer this opportunity for rising artists. So many amazing acts have been showcased by the Emerging Talent Competition over the years – and, as with the Festival, we welcome artists from all musical genres.”

Last year’s finalists were: Cordelia Gartside, EVA, FFSYTHO?!, Naomi Kimpenu, N’famady Kouyaté, The Love Buzz, and NME 100 stars for 2022, Prima Queen and VLURE.

2023’s winner was Guinea-born, Cardiff-based Kouyaté, who told NME of the accolade: “I feel like I’m dreaming.

“This is my first ever award in my musical career and I’m so glad it’s this as well. It’s a massive pleasure for the festival to offer me this opportunity. I’m feeling amazing.”

Other notable winners include Declan McKenna, who entered the competition in 2015 with his hit song ‘Brazil’. He was awarded a £5000 prize and a slot on the festival’s William’s Green Stage. Scouting For Girls, The Subways, Liz Green, Golden Silvers, We Have Band, Ellen and the Escapades, Treetop Flyers, Bridie Jackson and the Arbour, M+A and She Drew the Gun have also previously won the competition.

In other news, Glastonbury recently unveiled the line-up for the 2024 edition of the festival. Dua Lipa, Coldplay and SZA will headline the iconic Pyramid Stage this summer and Shania Twain will perform in the coveted legends slot on the Sunday.

Other acts on the poster include LCD Soundsystem, Little Simz, Burna Boy, PJ Harvey, Cyndi Lauper, Michael Kiwanuka, Janelle Monae, Olivia Dean, Paloma Faith and Keane – all of whom will appear on the Pyramid Stage.

The post One of these eight new artists will be playing Glastonbury 2024 as Emerging Talent Competition finalists revealed appeared first on NME.

Save Ferris’ Monique Powell on Their “Come on Eileen” Cover and 10 Things I Hate About You: Podcast

The frontwoman discusses having an immensely popular video on MTV and ska falling out of style.

Save Ferris’ Monique Powell on Their “Come on Eileen” Cover and 10 Things I Hate About You: Podcast
Consequence Staff

Consequence

 Listen via: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Amazon Music | More Platforms Ska truly began to break into the mainstream in the ’90s, s. And yet, even during that great ska boom, only a handful of bands had an actual radio hit. One of the few to accomplish such a feat was the Orange County-based group…

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Jeff Rosenstock Positively Rocks Columbus, Ohio: Review

Rosenstock, Sidney Gish, and Gladie stopped at Columbus’ King of Clubs on April 5th.

Jeff Rosenstock Positively Rocks Columbus, Ohio: Review
Jonah Krueger

Consequence

At this point, Jeff Rosenstock is something of an indie rock folk hero. He’s the Dave Grohl of the underground, the Johnny Appleseed of DIY punk circles, touring the country and planting good vibes and angsty tunes wherever he happens to set up shop. On Friday, April 5th, he rolled…

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